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Goal: 20,000 Progress: 4,368
Sponsored by: The Literacy Site

Our school lunches are failing our kids. Americans are becoming increasingly obese, and it's no wonder, when a whopping third of the vegetables children consume at school are potatoes.

Currently, the National School Lunch Program provides over 31 million low-income students with free or reduced-price lunch. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA), which went into effect in 2012, requires schools that are part of the program to offer fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and also requires students to choose a fruit or vegetable with their meal.

HHFKA increased the amount of money provided per meal to schools in the program by only six cents per meal to make to achieve these lofty goals, according to the NCSL (National Conference of State Legislatures).

According to the Daily Beast, kids are balking at the food selection, food is being wasted, and some schools have dropped out of the program because they're losing money.

One way to address this is the USDA's Farm to School Grant Program which has successfully funded 221 farm to school projects to date.

The benefits of sourcing produce from local communities are numerous. It would teach children healthier eating habits at a young age; local farmers would have increased demand and therefore increased profits; new jobs for cooks skilled in preparing produce would be created at schools; the environmental footprint would decrease because the produce has less distance to travel from farm to table; and our local economies would strengthen.

Sign the petition urging the Secretary of Agriculture to increase the budget for school lunches so that our local communities can offer healthy, well-prepared farm to table lunch options.

Sign Here






To the Secretary of Agriculture:

The rates of obesity among children and adolescents in the U.S. are astonishing. In the past 30 years, the number of obese children has more than doubled, and the number of obese adolescents has quadrupled, according to the CDC. And it's no wonder, since 1/3 of all "vegetables" offered at lunch are some form of potato!

Currently, the National School Lunch Program provides over 31 million, low-income students with free or reduced-price lunch, and that is fantastic — but the quality of those lunches is lacking.

Schools need a bigger budget to locally source produce, but they also need a bigger budget to hire skilled workers who know how to turn produce from bland to appetizing.

We need change. Kids, farmers, and communities nationwide would benefit from healthier, locally sourced produce for school lunches. Farm to school programs would teach children healthier eating habits at a young age; local farmers would have increased demand and therefore increased profits; new jobs would be created at schools to prepare the food in exciting ways; it would have a positive environmental impact; and our local economies would strengthen.

This would allow us to change the way our kids look at food, and change the course of their lives in the process.

You play a major role in this. We urge you to allocate more funds to our school lunch programs so that more schools can establish farm to table options.

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Jun 11, 2017 Linda Butler
Jun 9, 2017 Beth Smith
Jun 7, 2017 James Deschene
May 28, 2017 Raleigh koritz
May 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 21, 2017 (Name not displayed)
May 20, 2017 Shirley Troia
May 17, 2017 P D
May 16, 2017 Janice Banks
May 15, 2017 Dawn Ward-Doma
Apr 30, 2017 Susan Bonta Parents expect that their kids will be taken care of, whey the kids are in school. That means healthy lunches and snacks. For some kids, the school meals are all they get. Kids who eat junk food all the time are putting their health at risk.
Apr 29, 2017 Valerie Swaisland
Apr 28, 2017 Sonya Grant
Apr 28, 2017 Hope Gmyrek
Apr 25, 2017 Elizabeth Veillette
Apr 25, 2017 Chris Miller
Apr 25, 2017 Artem Vyzhenko
Apr 24, 2017 CAROL HENDERSON
Apr 24, 2017 Sławomir Prucnal
Apr 23, 2017 Joe and Karen Lansdale
Apr 23, 2017 Kara Walmsley
Apr 23, 2017 Nicole Schmid
Apr 22, 2017 Amina Jamal
Apr 21, 2017 Hazel Blanco Incer
Apr 21, 2017 Rebecca Davis
Apr 21, 2017 Saliha BELKHIR
Apr 21, 2017 Jean Buchanan
Apr 20, 2017 (Name not displayed) not just obesity it mental, physical health good food to build good immune system why so much mental illness really
Apr 20, 2017 Pankaj Rawat
Apr 20, 2017 Nancy Rittenhouse
Apr 20, 2017 Donna Reynoso-Brand
Apr 20, 2017 Mark Berriman
Apr 20, 2017 michele rule
Apr 20, 2017 Patrizia Lazzeri I urge the Secretary of Agriculture to increase the budget for school lunches so that our local communities can offer healthy, well-prepared farm to table lunch options. The the National School Lunch Program provides over 31 million, low-income students!
Apr 20, 2017 Heidi Parvela
Apr 20, 2017 Brenda Feliciano
Apr 20, 2017 Gina Bates Children need and deserve healthy school lunches. For some children, it is the biggest meal they get each day so it MUST be healthy! PLEASE encourage more healthy meals in schools!
Apr 20, 2017 Patrick Grocq
Apr 20, 2017 Ann Hollyfield
Apr 20, 2017 Julie Hillis
Apr 20, 2017 (Name not displayed) Basic nutritious , real person cooked food is a must. Our cafeterias are set up to cook not warm up food. No need to do vegetarian or vegan or whatever just plain good cooked meats and veggies and the kids will eat and be happy just like we were.
Apr 20, 2017 Lill-Jeanette Sunde
Apr 20, 2017 Gwen Weil
Apr 20, 2017 Fiona Priskich
Apr 20, 2017 Heather Switzer This is shameful and the only reason we have high obesity rates and increased medical costs are due to the big business of sugar and other unhealthy items. Our children need to have healthy and sustaining meals and should be able to obtain. them.
Apr 20, 2017 Pamela Puskarich
Apr 20, 2017 Natasha Jenkins
Apr 20, 2017 Melissa Lohman
Apr 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)

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